Posted on July 4, 2018, by & filed under News.


This month, 22 structures were demolished in the occupied Palestinian Territories (including East Jerusalem) displacing 13 people- 7 of whom are children- and affecting a further 121 people.

All the demolitions and confiscations but one- a Punitive demolition of a house in Barta’a ash Sharqia- occurred on the grounds of lacking an Israeli-issued building permit. Most of the demolished structures supported agricultural, herding and commercial livelihoods.

 

 

Full list of Demolitions:

 

  • On 2 June, 2018, Israeli military forces ordered a halt on the construction of a school in the village of Mreiha. Local residents reported that Israeli forces confiscated the working equipment from the site and ordered the construction to stop, for allegedly being built without an Israeli building
  • On 7 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished the unrecognised Bedouin village of Al- Araqib in the Naqab desert, south of Israel, for the 129thtime in a row, displacing its residents once again.
  • On 10 June, 2018, Israeli forces delivered eviction notices to Palestinian- Bedouin families living near the village of Nueima, Jericho. They were ordered to leave the shacks they live in prior to demolishing them.
  • On 11 June, 2018, Israeli forces ordered a halt on the construction of a house and issued a Stop Work order against an agricultural facility in the town of Al Khader, Bethlehem
  • On 19 June, 2018, Israeli forces arrived to the unrecognised Bedouin village Bir Al Mashash, in the Naqab desert, Southern Israel, in order to take photos of houses before issuing demolition orders. Two women and a man whose yard they entered were arrested under the claim they had assaulted the agents and policemen. The arrestees were released in the e
  • On 21 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a house in the unrecognised Bedouin village of A-Zarnuk, Naqab desert, Southern Israel.
  • On 20 June, 2018, Israeli forces delivered eight demolition orders targeting water wells and a shed, in the town of Teqoua’, Bethlehem. The wells and the shed were all built on privately owned Palestinian land.
  • On 20 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Silwan, East Jerusalem, affecting six people
  • On 20 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Sur Bahir, East Jerusalem, affecting five people
  • On 20 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Wadi al Joz, East Jerusalem, affecting 12 people from two households
  • On 20 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished two structures in Ath Thuri, East Jerusalem, affecting six people.
  • On 20 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a house under construction in Abu Dis, East Jerusalem, affecting ten people from two households.
  • On 20 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a house in Qalandiya, East Jerusalem, affecting four people, despite a court ruling barring the Israeli authorities from demolishing it. Israeli authorities have declared their intention to demolish at least 20 houses in the area, supposedly for being built too close to the Separation Wall.
  • On 21 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a house in Barta’a ash Sharqia, Jenin. The punitive demolition targeted the house of a Palestinian man who is accused of a ramming attack that killed two Israeli soldiers. The man has repeatedly denied the allegations and claims that it was an accident. The Israeli forces knocked down the inside walls of the 150 sq apartment, located on the third of an apartment building, causing significant damage to other apartments in the building. The demolition resulted in the displacement of three family members, who were not suspects and were not involved in any way in the alleged incident.
  • On 23 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Silwan, East Jerusalem, affecting 15 people from two households
  • On 23 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Ras al ‘Amud, East Jerusalem, affecting one person.
  • On 23 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Beit Hanina, East Jerusalem, displacing a family of four
  • On 24 June, 2018, Israeli forces delivered demolition orders targeting three Palestinian homes in the town of Nahalin, Bethlehem.
  • On 24 June, 2018, A Bedouin family in the unrecognised village of Umm Nmeila, Naqab desert, Southern Israel, self-demolished their home, after receiving a demolition order in which they were conditioned to either demolish their home or have the authorities do so and pay an exuberant fine that can reach up to tens of thousands of NIS. Umm Nmeila is one of dozens of unrecognised Bedouin villages in the Naqab desert that do not receive any basic services from the authorities including health and education services and are not connected to water or electricity.
  • On 25 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished six nurseries and agricultural structures in Hizma, East Jerusalem, affecting the livelihood of 49 people
  • On 25 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Sur Bahir, East Jerusalem, Displacing a family of six
  • On 26 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished a structure in Beit Hanina, East Jerusalem, affecting seven people from two households.
  • On 26 June, 2018, Two Palestinian families self demolished their under construction homes in Silwan, East Jerusalem, after receiving a demolition order in which they were ordered to either self demolish the houses or pay an exuberant fine for the Jerusalem municipality to do so.
  • On 26 June, 2018, Israeli forces dismantled a residential shed in Umm Fagarah, South Hebron Hills. This incident is the first of its kind; prior to this incident, Israeli forces opted to demolish the sheds and confiscate residents’ properties.
  • On 27 June, 2018, Israeli forces demolished the unrecognised Bedouin village of Al- Araquib in the Naqab desert, south of Israel, for the 130th time in a row, displacing its residents once again.
  • On 28 June 2018, Israeli forces demolished two houses in Jaljuliya, Israel. The two-storey buildings were still under construction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal updates:

 

military order concerning the Removal of New Buildings (No. 1797):

 

On 6 June, 2018, Haqel, in Defence of Human Rights, as the legal counsel to 7 village council leaders and Bimkom (NGO), submitted an appeal against the military order concerning the Removal of New Buildings (No. 1797), which permits the demolition of buildings constructed without a permit, and which actually nullifies the right to a hearing, while in the area in which no master plan applies (most of the Palestinian buildings), buildings may be demolished immediately and without any hearing.

 

On 20 June, 2018, Haqel updated that In response to the High Court appeals submitted, the State announced the previous day that the new

order will not be implemented and enforced until the High Court takes a decision. The appeals were submitted urgently before the order took effect demanding an interim injunction to cancel and freeze the order.

 

As Haqel explains, the army effectively cancels the Jordanian planning and building law with the new military order and prepares the ground for legalizing massive demolitions of Palestinian structures in Area C.

the new order was supposed to go into effect on 17.6.18 against new buildings (Temporary Order) (No. 1797) (Year 5778 – 2018). The new order is exceptional, violating acceptable legal standards and changes all existing rules regarding the enforcement of planning and buildings laws in Area C. The appeal submitted presents arguments against the army’s right to cancel existing laws regarding Israeli control of the West Bank unless there is an absolute military necessity or a need to guarantee public law, order and security for the local protected population or for essential humanitarian needs. In the appeal, Haqel claims that these reasons are absent in this case and that the order in itself violates international humanitarian law and international human rights law. The order allows the authorities almost total and unlimited freedom to immediately demolish Palestinian homes and structures in Area C.

The new order is politically motivated and freezes the ability to develop communities in the short term while allowing for massive demolitions of Palestinian structures in the medium term, resulting in the displacement of the Palestinian population in Area C. The order severely limits and effectively eliminates the right to a hearing and the opportunity

to appeal before demolitions in the West Bank are carried out. These rights are enshrined in Jordanian law. Jordanian planning law protects the right to a hearing and appeal and allows for proper procedure enabling a realistic time frame to appeal which is fundamental and

essential to the right for due process prior to the irreversible violation of the right to property and shelter. Jordanian law was first applied in 1966 and has been in place since the Israeli occupation of the West Bank.

The new order effectively eliminates the existing law and allows for immediate demolition of structures built without permits in areas without detailed zoning plans and in cases where such plans do exist, allows for the submission of a request to cancel the demolition within 96 hours from the time the demolition notice is presented.

In light of the fact that most Palestinian villages in Area C do not have zoning plans and the refusal of authorities to provide building permits and approve building plans, the new order is clearly political and is aimed at limiting the ability of communities to expand and encouraging the elimination of Palestinian communities in the West Bank. The new order is motivated by pressure from the right wing who see the Palestinian residents in the West Bank as enemies and that structures built for survival as “terror”. The main motivation behind the order is to promote Israeli political and ideological interests to maximize

land control in Area C which have no basis in the army’s obligation to protect the rights of a protected people.

 

The appeals were submitted urgently before the order took effect demanding an interim injunction to cancel and freeze the order. In response to the appeals submitted, the State decided not to implement the order until a legal decision is taken following the response of the State to the appeals submitted.